24 Syllabus--ENGL 293-002

24 Syllabus-ENGL - English 293-002 American Literary History(Winter 2011 MWF 12:00-12:50 a.m 373 MARB Instructor Brian Roberts Office 4153 JFSB

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Unformatted text preview: English 293-002: American Literary History (Winter 2011, MWF 12:00-12:50 a.m., 373 MARB) Instructor: Brian Roberts Office: 4153 JFSB Phone: 422-1376 Email: [email protected] Office Hours: MW, 1:00 to 2:20 PM COURSE TEXT Nina Baym, ed., The Norton Anthology of American Literature, Shorter Edition (7 th ed). Two Volume set. ISBN 9780393930580 OVERVIEW English 293 provides students with a foundational overview of US literature’s major historical, cultural, political, philosophical, and aesthetic movements from the “discovery” of the Americas to the present day. A fifteen-week course cannot cover all of the writers that have been regarded as important during a span of over four centuries, and English 293 does not attempt to do so. Instead, we will turn to a series of writers and literary works whose concerns are representative or suggestive of the larger milieus and movements from which they emerged and in which they participated. Throughout the semester, as we survey these movements and milieus, we will trace and interrogate the often unstable meanings of the terms comprising the course’s title: American , Literary , and History . The course readings, lectures, discussions, and assignments will help students develop overarching narratives and reading skills that will prepare them for continued study of US and American literatures in upper-level courses. COURSE LEARNING OBJECTIVES As an introductory undergraduate course, ENGL 293 brings focus to American literary history to offer student the opportunity to engage in thinking about and developing many of the foundational skills associated with the English major. The course’s broad focus permits students to begin to develop and demonstrate excellence in the English Major’s six learning objectives: 1. English graduates will be able to read critically and analyze traditional literary genres and other forms of texts. In this course, we will direct attention to developing analytic skills that relate to reading the major literary genres: fiction, poetry, and drama. We will also develop analytic skills in relation to other genres including life-writing and histories. 2. English graduates will be able to develop and communicate their ideas clearly in writing. This includes sound sentence-level mechanics and style, a clear focus, and cohesive overall development. In this course, students will dedicate themselves to developing and clearly communicating their ideas as they write two papers—a response paper and a final paper. 3. English graduates will be able to identify and evaluate appropriate research sources, incorporate these sources into well-documented formal academic writing, and formulated their own arguments based at least in part on those sources. In this course, students will develop and refine skills in researching literary- critical sources ....
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2011 for the course ENG 293 taught by Professor Brianroberts during the Spring '11 term at BYU.

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24 Syllabus-ENGL - English 293-002 American Literary History(Winter 2011 MWF 12:00-12:50 a.m 373 MARB Instructor Brian Roberts Office 4153 JFSB

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