ch09 - CHAPTER 9 COST ALLOCATIONS: THEORY AND APPLICATIONS...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
CHAPTER 9 COST ALLOCATIONS:  THEORY AND APPLICATIONS TRUE/FALSE 1. Changing a product mix is an example of a short-term decision. LO1 – False Changing a product mix is an example of a long-term decision. 2. Capacity costs are controllable over the long-term. LO1 – True 3. While profit margin is the appropriate measure of value for short-term decisions, contribution  margin is the appropriate measure for long-term decisions. LO1 – False While contribution margin is the appropriate measure of value for short-term  decisions, profit margin is the appropriate measure for long-term decisions. 4. Some firms refer to the overhead rate as the burden because they charge, or burden, each  product with this amount. LO1 – True 5. When firms use allocated costs to make decisions, the quality of their decisions depend on  how well the allocation estimates the capacity cost associated with the various options. LO1 – True 6. Firms must prepare income statements and balance sheets in accordance with Generally  Accepted Accounting Principles, which requires firms to use variable costing. LO2 – False Firms must prepare income statements and balance sheets in accordance with  Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, which requires firms to use absorption  costing.  7. Because indirect manufacturing costs are  not  traceable to individual products, their cost is  allocated only to period expenditures. LO2 – False Because indirect manufacturing costs are not traceable to individual products,  companies must allocate them to products. 8. Under absorption costing, the value of a unit of a product includes all product costs. LO2 – True 9-1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
9. Accounting for fixed manufacturing overhead is the only difference between variable and  absorption costing. LO2 – True 10. At the end of the accounting period, the cost of goods sold account and the finished goods  inventory account will include fixed manufacturing costs. LO2 – True 9-2
Background image of page 2
Cost Allocations: Theory and Applications 11. An example of allocations to justify costs and reimbursements is when government entities  contract to compensate their suppliers on a fixed negotiated contract amount. LO3 – False An example of allocations to justify costs and reimbursements is when  government entities contract to compensate their suppliers on a cost-plus basis. 12. Suppliers often prefer cost-plus contracts when there is uncertainty about the final cost or  project success, as it allows them to share the risk of cost overruns with the customer.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 41

ch09 - CHAPTER 9 COST ALLOCATIONS: THEORY AND APPLICATIONS...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online