EL5363 WK2 LECTURE physical layer1

EL5363 WK2 LECTURE physical layer1 - Physical Layer 1...

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1 Physical Layer 1 Transmission, Media & Encoding
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2 Physical Layer Goal Provide reliable data transmission 0100 1101 0101 0100 1101 0101 Physical Layer Defines Medium Signals Data rate Encoding Mechanical Communication Networks © Kang Xi, Polytechnic Institute of NYU
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3 Transmission Direction Simplex: A B only Half-Duplex: A B and B A, but not simultaneously Full-Duplex: A B and B A, and simultaneously Communication Networks © Kang Xi, Polytechnic Institute of NYU
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Communication Networks © Kang Xi, Polytechnic Institute of NYU 4 simplex one direction e.g. television half duplex either direction, but only one way at a time e.g. police radio full duplex both directions at the same time e.g. telephone A transmission may be simplex, half duplex, or full duplex. In simplex transmission, signals are transmitted in only one direction; one station is transmitter and the other is receiver. In half-duplex operation, both stations may transmit, but only one at a time. In full-duplex operation, both stations may transmit simultaneously, and the medium is carrying signals in both directions at the same time. We should note that the definitions just given are the ones in common use in the United States (ANSI definitions). Elsewhere (ITU-T definitions), the term simplex is used to correspond to half duplex and duplex is used to correspond to full duplex.
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5 Communication Networks © Kang Xi, Polytechnic Institute of NYU
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6 Real world Mostly analog Why digital All information bits Unified storage, transmission, processing Communication Networks © Kang Xi, Polytechnic Institute of NYU
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7 Benefit of Digitization Robust to noise 1 0 1 Communication Networks © Kang Xi, Polytechnic Institute of NYU
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8 Benefit of Digitization Powerful digital signal processing based on VLSI Data, voice and video integration Strong encryption Communication Networks © Kang Xi, Polytechnic Institute of NYU V ery L arge- S cale I ntegration , the process of placing thousands (or hundreds of thousands) of electronic components on a single chip . Nearly all modern chips employ VLSI architectures , or ULSI (ultra large scale integration). The line between VLSI and ULSI is vague.
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Analog Digital 9 Communication Networks © Kang Xi, Polytechnic Institute of NYU
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2011 for the course EE 5363 taught by Professor Kang during the Spring '09 term at NYU Poly.

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EL5363 WK2 LECTURE physical layer1 - Physical Layer 1...

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