Forensics and video analysis

Forensics and video analysis - Law Enforcement/Emergency...

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Law Enforcement/Emergency Services Video Association LEVA Guidelines for the Best Practice in the Forensic Analysis of Video Evidence
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Law Enforcement/Emergency Services Video Association LEVA Contents This document is divided into the following sections: 1. Goal 2. Introduction 3. Scope 4. Recovery of Video Evidence 5. Essential Equipment 6. Process of Forensic Analysis 7. Output of Forensic Analysis 8. Analysis Review 9. Training 10. Appendix A 11. Appendix B
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Law Enforcement/Emergency Services Video Association LEVA 1. Goal The goal of this document is to provide a framework for the relevant concepts and issues in the scientific examination, comparison and/or evaluation of video in legal matters. This framework is designed within the acceptable practices of the forensic video analysis community. 2. Introduction As video recording devices and Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) systems become a more affordable option in the private and public sectors, there is a corresponding increase in the frequency in which they are encountered in criminal investigations. The ability to obtain detailed information from video evidence has tremendous potential to assist with investigations. Care must be taken to make sure video evidence is accurately processed and presented in court. Forensic video analysis is the scientific examination, comparison and/or evaluation of video in legal matters. Advancement of technology is bringing this field of science from the crime laboratories to the investigating agents. The benefits of this are twofold: First, results can be obtained more rapidly when the analysis is performed in the same city as the incident. Second, trained analysts available at the local level are able to work cases viewed as too minor to submit to the crime lab. The best way to ensure the reliability of the video evidence is to have standard operating procedures (SOPs) in place. SOPs assist the forensic video analyst in maintaining proper records of the processes used to examine the evidence and that the processes are performed in a scientifically appropriate and uniformed manner. Records should be complete enough that a similarly experienced and trained individual, working with the same technology, could reproduce similar results.
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Law Enforcement/Emergency Services Video Association LEVA 3. Scope The scope of this document considers the recovery of video evidence, equipment for forensic analysis, process of forensic video analysis, output of video evidence, review of findings, and training considerations for analysts. 4. Recovery of Video Evidence General principles for seizing and maintaining video evidence should be followed by law enforcement agencies. These general principles are: 1. Rules of Evidence. The same general rules of evidence should be applied to all video evidence just as it would to any other type of exhibit such as a knife at a homicide or fingerprints at a break-in. . 2.
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Forensics and video analysis - Law Enforcement/Emergency...

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