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Chapter 1 - Chapter 1 Abnormal Psychology Click to edit...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 4/7/11 Chapter 1 Abnormal Psychology Spring 2011 Dr. Coles
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4/7/11 What Do We Mean by Abnormality? There is no consensus definition There are, however, some clear elements of abnormality 22
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4/7/11 The Elements of Abnormality Elements of abnormality include: Suffering Maladaptiveness Deviancy Violation of the Standards of Society Social Discomfort Irrationality and Unpredictability 33
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4/7/11 The Elements of Abnormality However, no one element is sufficient to define or determine abnormality, and what is considered deviant changes as society changes 44
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4/7/11 The DSM-IV Definition of Mental Disorder A clinically significant behavioral or psychological syndrome or pattern Associated with distress or disability (i.e., impairment in one or more important areas of functioning) Not simply a predictable and culturally sanctioned response to a particular event (e.g., the death of a loved one) Considered to reflect behavioral, psychological, or biological dysfunction in the individual 55
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4/7/11 Why Do We Need to Classify Mental Disorders? Classification systems provide us with a nomenclature that allows us to structure information Classification also has social and political implications Diagnostic classification systems classify disorders, not people 66
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4/7/11 What Are the Disadvantages Loss of information regarding individual Stigma associated with diagnosis Stereotypes based on diagnosis Labeling can impact self-concept 77
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4/7/11 How Does Culture Affect What Is Considered Cultural factors influence the presentation of disorders found all over the globe Certain forms of psychopathology are highly culture-specific Some unconventional actions and behaviors are universally considered the product of mental disorder 88
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4/7/11 Culture-Specific Disorders Certain forms of psychopathology appear to be highly specific to certain cultures Examples Taijin kyofusho—in Japan Anxiety about body or bodily functions offending others Ataque de nervios—in Latinos and Latinas especially from the Caribbean Loss of control including crying, trembling, 99
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4/7/11 How Common Are Mental Disorders? Significant question for many reasons Planning, establishing, and funding mental health services for specific disorders Frequency can provide clues to causes of mental disorders For example, schizophrenia is more common in some populations than others, so factors related to those populations may play a
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2011 for the course BSC 2085 taught by Professor Gomez during the Spring '11 term at FIU.

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Chapter 1 - Chapter 1 Abnormal Psychology Click to edit...

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