Jiam_Mgrl_4e_SolutionsManual_Ch05

Jiam_Mgrl_4e_SolutionsManual_Ch05 - Chapter 5 Variable...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 5 Variable Costing QUESTIONS 1. In full costing, fixed manufacturing overhead is treated as a product cost. In variable costing, fixed manufacturing overhead is treated as a period cost. 2. When production exceeds sales, part of fixed manufacturing overhead will remain in inventory. In variable costing, the entire amount of fixed manufacturing overhead will be expensed since it is treated as a period cost. Thus, income computed under full costing will exceed income computed under variable costing when production exceeds sales. 3. Variable costing facilitates C-V-P analysis since fixed and variable costs are separated and a contribution margin is calculated. Also, under variable costing, managers cannot artificially inflate profit by producing more units than they sell and burying fixed manufacturing overhead in inventory. 4. Companies using JIT generally have low levels of work in process and finished goods inventory. Thus, even when a company uses full costing, very little of fixed manufacturing overhead is in inventory at the end of a period. Rather, most of it is in cost of goods sold—an expense. 5. Under full costing, ending inventory includes direct material, direct labor, variable manufacturing overhead, and fixed manufacturing overhead. Under variable costing, ending inventory includes each of these items except fixed manufacturing overhead. Thus, the inventory balance under variable costing is always less than the balance under full costing (assuming the balance is not zero). 6. The full costing method will result in higher income. In this method, fixed manufacturing overhead applied to units produced but not sold in the year will appear in ending inventory. This amount of fixed manufacturing overhead is expensed under variable costing, causing income under full costing to be greater than under variable costing. 7. The variable costing method will result in higher income. In this method, the beginning inventory charged to cost of goods sold is less than that under full costing since cost of goods sold under full costing contains fixed manufacturing overhead not expensed the previous year. The result is that income is greater under variable costing than full costing. 8. Under variable costs, fixed manufacturing overhead costs are expensed in the year they are incurred. Meanwhile, full costing calculates the amount of fixed manufacturing overhead per unit produced for the year and includes this amount in Jiambalvo Managerial Accounting the product’s unit cost. Then, the product’s unit cost is expensed when the product is sold. 9. The resulting number represents the difference in net income under full costing and variable costing. 10. Fixed production costs per unit are calculated by dividing total fixed production costs by the number of units produced. Each unit in ending inventory then receives this amount per unit. A company can “bury” fixed costs in inventory by overproducing. The more the company overproduces, the more fixed cost remains...
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2011 for the course BUS 5431 taught by Professor Muth during the Spring '09 term at FIT.

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Jiam_Mgrl_4e_SolutionsManual_Ch05 - Chapter 5 Variable...

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