Ch1-TheBasics

Ch1-TheBasics - Clark Guest 2008 ECE 30 Engineering...

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The Basics ECE 30 ©Clark Guest 2008 ECE 30 Engineering Computation Course Information Instructor: Clark Guest Office: EBU1-3407 Phone: 858-534-6549 email: cguest@ucsd.edu (Put ECE 30 in subject line) Patterson and Hennessy Website: http://cguest.pageout.net (Course notes) Grading: 40% Weekly Quizzes 30% Programming Labs (SPIM simulator on your own computer) 30% Final Exam 2 ©Clark Guest 2008 ECE 30 Engineering Computation Course Outline We e k To p i c Read 1 The Basics Ch.1,A.1-A.4 2 The MIPS Architecture Refer to Ch.5 3-4 MIPS Assembly Language Ch.3, A.9-A.10 5-6 Computer Arithmetic Ch. 4 7 Performance Ch. 2 8 MIPS Architecture-Revisited Ch. 5 9 Pipelining Ch. 6 10 Memory Caches Ch. 7 ©Clark Guest 2008 ECE 30 Engineering Computation The Basics What happens when you press a key Layers of software From text file to computer instructions How computer chips are made 4
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©Clark Guest 2008 ECE 30 Engineering Computation What Happens When You Press a Key Keyboard Embedded Processor USB Receiver CPU RAM Bu f er Word Processing Data Display Data Graphics Controller Display Monitor ©Clark Guest 2008 ECE 30 Engineering Computation What Happens When You Press a Key (2) Suppose you are using a word processing program. You press the letter “A” on the keyboard. Then. .. The key closes an electrical contact. A microprocessor in the keyboard (an embedded processor) senses it is a contact in the first column, second row of an array of contacts. The keyboard processor looks up in its own memory that the code for that contact is 01000001. The microprocessor sends that code, one bit at a time (perhaps over USB) to the computer motherboard. 6 ©Clark Guest 2008 ECE 30 Engineering Computation What Happens When You Press a Key (3) The USB receive processor sets a signal line high (an interrupt). The central processing unit (CPU) senses the interrupt. Instead of executing the next instruction in the word processing program, it jumps to a subroutine in the operating system (OS). The CPU reads from an address that the OS knows for the USB receive processor, which places the 01000001 code in parallel on the CPU data bus. The OS first has the CPU read the code into one of its registers, then it writes the contents of the register to a memory location (a buffer). The OS subroutine returns to the word processing program. 7 ©Clark Guest 2008 ECE 30 Engineering Computation What Happens When You Press a Key (4) The word processing program continues on until it reaches a subroutine call to the OS. The OS call checks to see if any events (keypresses, mouseclicks, etc) have occurred. The OS call returns to the word processing program with a code for “keypress” on the top of the system stack, and the code 01000001 (which it has retrieved from the buffer) next on the stack. The word processing program jumps to a subroutine
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This note was uploaded on 04/06/2011 for the course ECE 30 taught by Professor Gert during the Spring '08 term at UCSD.

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Ch1-TheBasics - Clark Guest 2008 ECE 30 Engineering...

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