CPChapter6

CPChapter6 - Chapter Six Emotional Development and...

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4/7/11 Chapter Six Emotional Development and Attachment
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4/7/11 Early Emotional Emotions are Subjective reactions Usually experienced cognitively Generally has a form of physiological arousal Communicated to others through behavior Functions of emotions Communicates feelings, social interactions
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4/7/11 Early Emotional Perspectives on emotional development Genetic-maturational perspective Emotions have biological underpinnings Individual differences in temperament Identical and fraternal twin research Learning perspective Individual emotional expressions result from individual experiences Experiences elicit and reinforce responses
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4/7/11 Early Emotional Perspectives on emotional development Functionalist perspective Help in achieving goals and adapting to the environment Emphasizes roles in social relationships Emotional signals (social cues) guide behaviors Emotions attached to memories
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4/7/11 Early Emotional Developing emotional expressions Infants have a wide range of emotions at a very early age Newborns have specific emotions Facial expressions emerge Two types of emotions: Primary emotions (i.e., startle) Secondary emotions (i.e., shame)
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4/7/11 Emotions emotions Joy Fear Surpris Interes t Sadn ess Emerge early in life – no introspection or self-reflection is required emotions Prid Embarrass ment Jealou sy Guilt Sha me Emerge later in development – self- conscious emotions Emotional developme nt influenced by Genetics Environment Experiences
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4/7/11 Primary Emotions Smiling and laughter are the first expressions of pleasure Newborn infants display reflex smiles Infants show preferences for human faces Special smiles for mothers – Duchenne smiles
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4/7/11 Primary Emotions Primary emotions Spontaneous, origins unknown Smiles signal pleasure, encourage social interactions with caregiver and others Wide range of stimuli has effects later, responses to visual stimuli increase More selective with smiles at 3 months
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4/7/11 Primary Emotions Primary emotions Increased laughing at 7 months Response to social games at end of first year Negative emotions Wariness develops at about 3 months Unfamiliar events cause distress in most Stranger distress at 7 to 9 months, reactions vary by previous
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4/7/11 10-12 4-6 7-9 Age (in months) 20 0 5 10 25 30 35 15 Laughter at stimuli (percent) Social Tactil e Audit ory Visual What Makes Children Laugh?
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4/7/11
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CPChapter6 - Chapter Six Emotional Development and...

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