sociology notes 10-21, 10-26

sociology notes 10-21, 10-26 - October 12th, 2010 DEVIANCE

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October 12 th , 2010 DEVIANCE -the recognized violation of cultural norms - cultural norms - majority of people see something as normal or abnormal -connect behavior that is “weird” -connect certain behavioral aspects that are considered illegal ex: people sexually obsessed with anamie -can be a single event (fly is down) or a series of events (women’s suffrage movement) or as a way of life (otaku) Biological -Biological determinism- inherited, “it’s part of my nature”, idea that people unable to control their deviant behavior -phrenology- idea that you can predict deviance based on physical looks (discredited) Psychological -nature and nurture Social structure -socialization -social-control perspective- when someone is in a state of anomie, they will become deviant -limits are defined by society- who decides what is normal behavior? -- points to the limits of cultural norms- can point out where culture is lacking (are institutions doing their jobs?!) *Deviance is defined according to its relationship with cultural norms -sex: in some cultures, not fulfilling your spouse is considered deviant and therefore, affairs and punishments are the cultural norm - no standard for a universal deviance * Deviance is defined by social power - those in social power and in the majority create social norms - no “coming out” as straight—we assign not being gay as the social norm Durkheim’s ideas on Deviance: 1. affirms values and norms 2. clarifies moral boundaries 3. strengthens communal bonds 4. encourage social change ex: 9/11- extremely deviant act managed to unite an entire country- sparked solidarity—forced people to come together to “rebuild” country
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ex: Rosa Parks- deviance sparked social change OCTOBER 21, 2010 1. Understanding sexuality 2. Sexual orientation - very primal aspect of life sexuality constitutes a system by which bodies acquire a meaning- sexuality is not naturally given (not purely a product of nature), but rather a historical force- rooted in time and place - knowledge of sex is not created out of thin air- created out of what other cultures say about sex - sex is not a simple act btw 2 people, but a whole way of looking at the world sex is the root of everything sexuality defines us in society- social power stands at the heart of the discussion of the deconstruction of reality -social powers (state, school, church) manages to regulate and control what bodies do— what is proper/improper sexual behavior and identity? Ancient Greece- men decided who were men and who were not (determined sexual identity)
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sociology notes 10-21, 10-26 - October 12th, 2010 DEVIANCE

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