aa-4 - Health Education Journal http:/hej.sagepub.com/...

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http://hej.sagepub.com/ Health Education Journal http://hej.sagepub.com/content/69/3/277 The online version of this article can be found at: DOI: 10.1177/0017896910369412 2010 69: 277 originally published online 4 May 2010 Health Education Journal Triece Turnbull, Paul van Schaik and Anna van Wersch Adolescents' preferences regarding sex education and relationship education Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com can be found at: Health Education Journal Additional services and information for http://hej.sagepub.com/cgi/alerts Email Alerts: http://hej.sagepub.com/subscriptions Subscriptions: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsReprints.nav Reprints: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.nav Permissions: http://hej.sagepub.com/content/69/3/277.refs.html Citations: at BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIV on September 13, 2010 hej.sagepub.com Downloaded from
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h e j Article Health Education Journal 69(3) 277–286 © The Author(s) 2010 Reprints and permission: sagepub. co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav DOI: 10.1177/0017896910369412 http://hej.sagepub.com Corresponding author: Paul van Schaik, Psychology Subject Group, School of Social Sciences and Law, University of Teesside, Middlesbrough, TS1 3BA, UK Email: P.Van-Schaik@tees.ac.uk Adolescents’ preferences regarding sex education and relationship education Triece Turnbull, Paul van Schaik and Anna van Wersch School of Social Sciences and Law, University of Teesside, UK Abstract Objective: The aim of the current study was to examine adolescents’ perceptions of the quality of a Sex and Relationship Education (SRE) intervention, their preferences for sources of SRE and how these vary as a function of gender, school’s faith and school type. Design: A non-experimental design was used. Setting: The participants ( N = 759 adolescent girls [ n = 448] and boys [ n = 326]), who had attended an SRE intervention and had previously been given formal SRE within the school they attended, completed a survey questionnaire. Method: A questionnaire was designed to assess perceptions and preference of the intervention. The data were analysed using logistic regression. Results: Adolescents judged the sex education intervention to be of high quality and enjoyed being taught by sexual-health workers. Preferred sources of SRE included sexual-health workers, parents and peers as well as the media. Gender, school’s faith (Church of England or Catholic) and school type (mainstream, special needs) were predictors of preference for various aspects of SRE. Conclusion: The results highlight the crucial role of experienced qualified SRE educators, but also the supplementary role of parents and peers as well as the auxiliary role of Internet sites, magazines, phone lines and schools. Stereotypical preferences of boys and girls outside SRE seem to be perpetuated in SRE, and special needs and mainstream adolescents’ preferences are consistent with their communication and education outside SRE. Keywords
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2011 for the course HLTH 300 taught by Professor Randypage during the Winter '11 term at BYU.

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aa-4 - Health Education Journal http:/hej.sagepub.com/...

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