aa-13 - R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Beyond the Model...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Beyond the Model Minority Stereotype: Trends in Health Risk Behaviors Among Asian/Pacific Islander High School Students S UNG-J AE L EE , PhD a M ARY J ANE R OTHERAM-B ORUS , PhD b ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Asian/Pacific Islander (API) students have been stereotyped as the model minority. The objective of this study was to examine the trends in health risk behaviors among API students who participated in the San Diego City Schools Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) between 1993 and 2005. METHODS: High school students from the San Diego City School District completed the self-administered YRBS between 1993 and 2005. Among sexually active students, logistic regression for survey data was used to examine trends in health risk behaviors. RESULTS: From 1993 to 2005, condom use at last sexual intercourse was consistently lower among API students than their cross-ethnic peers. We observed a significant increasing trend in lifetime smoking, drinking, and marijuana use. Parental communications regarding human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were significantly less frequent and decreased over time. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings challenge the notion of API youth being the model minority. API students face unique challenges, including barriers to good communication about sex and lower rates of condom use. School-based prevention programs are needed for API students, including a focus on HIV communication with parents. Keywords: Child and adolescent health; risk behaviors; health communication. Citation: Lee S-J, Rotheram-Borus MJ. Beyond the model minority stereotype: Trends in health risk behaviors among Asian/Pacific Islander high school students. J Sch Health. 2009; 79: 347-354. Accepted March 24, 2009 a Assistant ResearchEpidemiologist, (sjlee@mednet.ucla.edu), Universityof California, Los Angeles; Semel Institutefor NeuroscienceandHumanBehavior, Center for Community Health, 10920WilshireBlvd., Suite350, Los Angeles, CA90024. b Professor of ChildPsychiatryandBiobehavioral Sciences, (rotheram@ucla.edu), Universityof California, LosAngeles; Semel Institutefor NeuroscienceandHumanBehavior, Center for CommunityHealth, 10920WilshireBlvd., Suite350, Los Angeles, CA90024. Address correspondence to: Sung-Jae Lee, Assistant Research Epidemiologist, (sjlee@mednet.ucla.edu), University of California, Los Angeles; Semel Institute for Neuroscience and HumanBehavior, Center for CommunityHealth, 10920WilshireBlvd., Suite350, Los Angeles, CA90024. This paper was completed with the support of the Center for HIV Identification, Prevention, and Treatment Services (CHIPTS; NIMH Grant P30 MH58107). We thank all those who participated in the study, as well as those who assisted in preparing the manuscript, including Dr. Martha Lee for her critical review of the early versions of the manuscript, Dr....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 04/07/2011 for the course HLTH 300 taught by Professor Randypage during the Winter '11 term at BYU.

Page1 / 8

aa-13 - R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Beyond the Model...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online