aa-23 - The Diabetes Educator http:/tde.sagepub.com/...

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http://tde.sagepub.com/ The Diabetes Educator http://tde.sagepub.com/content/36/2/310 The online version of this article can be found at: DOI: 10.1177/0145721710361784 2010 36: 310 originally published online 25 February 2010 The Diabetes Educator Lidia García-Pérez, Lilisbeth Perestelo-Pérez, Pedro Serrano-Aguilar and Maria del Mar Trujillo-Martín Mellitus Effectiveness of a Psychoeducative Intervention in a Summer Camp for Children With Type 1 Diabetes Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com On behalf of: American Association of Diabetes Educators can be found at: The Diabetes Educator Additional services and information for http://tde.sagepub.com/cgi/alerts Email Alerts: http://tde.sagepub.com/subscriptions Subscriptions: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsReprints.nav Reprints: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.nav Permissions: at BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIV on September 13, 2010 tde.sagepub.com Downloaded from
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The Diabetes EDUCATOR 310 Volume 36, Number 2, March/April 2010 Effectiveness of a Psychoeducative Intervention in a Summer Camp for Children With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effective- ness of a psychoeducative intervention implemented in a summer camp for children with type 1 diabetes. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted comparing 2 groups of children with type 1 diabetes. The intervention group (n = 34) received interventions that addressed knowl- edge, behaviors, skills, and psychological factors during a summer camp. The control group (n = 23) received the usual education and care. Evaluated measurements were glycosyl- ated hemoglobin (A1C), diabetes knowledge, anxiety, psy- chological adaptation, and use of health care services. Results No significant changes in A1C annual average, body mass index (BMI), diabetes knowledge, anxiety, medical visits, or hospital admissions were observed after the intervention in comparison with before intervention. Only the adapta- tion to the school environment improved significantly. The control group significantly increased BMI and A1C. Conclusions No relevant variations in diabetes knowledge, anxiety, psychological adaptation, or use of health care services Lidia García-Pérez, BA, MMR Lilisbeth Perestelo-Pérez, PhD, MPsych Pedro Serrano-Aguilar, MD, PhD, MPH Maria del Mar Trujillo-Martín, PhD From the Canary Islands Research & Health Foundation (Fundación Canaria de Investigación y Salud), Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain (Ms García-Pérez, Dr Trujillo-Martín); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública, Barcelona, Spain (Ms García-Pérez, Dr Perestelo-Pérez, Dr Serrano-Aguilar); and Planning & Evaluation Unit, Canary Islands Health Authority, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain (Dr Perestelo-Pérez, Dr Serrano-Aguilar). Correspondence to Lidia García-Pérez, BA, MMR, Servicio de Evaluación y
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2011 for the course HLTH 300 taught by Professor Randypage during the Winter '11 term at BYU.

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aa-23 - The Diabetes Educator http:/tde.sagepub.com/...

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