aa-34 - Health Promotion Practice http:/hpp.sagepub.com/...

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http://hpp.sagepub.com/ Health Promotion Practice http://hpp.sagepub.com/content/11/5/714 The online version of this article can be found at: DOI: 10.1177/1524839908328998 2010 11: 714 originally published online 31 January 2009 Health Promot Pract Theresa Webb, Kathryn Martin, Abdelmonem A. Afifi and Jess Kraus Media Literacy as a Violence-Prevention Strategy: A Pilot Evaluation Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com On behalf of: Society for Public Health Education can be found at: Health Promotion Practice Additional services and information for http://hpp.sagepub.com/cgi/alerts Email Alerts: http://hpp.sagepub.com/subscriptions Subscriptions: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsReprints.nav Reprints: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.nav Permissions: http://hpp.sagepub.com/content/11/5/714.refs.html Citations: at BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIV on September 13, 2010 hpp.sagepub.com Downloaded from
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Health Promotion Practice September 2010 Vol. 11, No. 5, 714-722 DOI: 10.1177/1524839908328998 ©2010 Society for Public Health Education Authors’ Note: Support for this research was provided by the Southern California Injury Prevention Research Center, which is funded by a grant from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (5 R49 CE000199-02). Please address correspondence to Theresa Webb, Department of Epidemiology, Southern California Injury Prevention Research Center, UCLA School of Public Health, 10960 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1550, Los Angeles, CA 90024- 2884;e-mail: twebb@ucla.edu. Media Literacy as a Violence-Prevention Strategy: A Pilot Evaluation Theresa Webb, PhD Kathryn Martin, PhD Abdelmonem A. Afifi, PhD Jess Kraus, MPH, PhD each of these domains has a system of self-regulation in place has made no significant impact on content or child- hood exposure to it. The only tangible effect that self- regulation has had is that of letting the entertainment industry off the hook by placing the burden of exposure on parents, many of whom have expressed dissatisfac- tion with the options available to them—the v-chip and the ratings systems (Gentile & Walsh, 2002). Considering the contentious debate that has evolved between enter- tainment industry apologists and parents and their academic allies, media literacy education seems to be one of the more hopeful solutions to the problem of media exposure to violence (Strasburger & Wilson, 2002). Despite the pervasiveness of exposure to violence in the media, media literacy efforts focused exclusively on this issue are rare. However, media literacy has been used as a successful public health approach for several other important issues, such as the prevention of alco- hol and tobacco use (Gonzales, Davoudi, & Glik, 2004). Based at least in part on the positive outcomes of these
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aa-34 - Health Promotion Practice http:/hpp.sagepub.com/...

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