aa-36 - Health Education Journal http:/hej.sagepub.com/...

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http://hej.sagepub.com/ Health Education Journal http://hej.sagepub.com/content/69/3/333 The online version of this article can be found at: DOI: 10.1177/0017896910364568 2010 69: 333 originally published online 2 July 2010 Health Education Journal Tim Little, Jessica Henderson, Peggy Pedersen and Linda Stonecipher Oregon Perceptions of teen pregnancy among high school students in Sweet Home, Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com can be found at: Health Education Journal Additional services and information for http://hej.sagepub.com/cgi/alerts Email Alerts: http://hej.sagepub.com/subscriptions Subscriptions: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsReprints.nav Reprints: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.nav Permissions: http://hej.sagepub.com/content/69/3/333.refs.html Citations: at BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIV on September 13, 2010 hej.sagepub.com Downloaded from
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Article h e j Health Education Journal 69(3) 333–343 © The Author(s) 2010 Reprints and permission: sagepub. co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav DOI: 10.1177/0017896910364568 http://hej.sagepub.com Corresponding author: Jessica Henderson, PhD, Professor of Community Health Education, Division of Health and Physical Education, 345 North Monmouth Avenue, Western Oregon University, Monmouth, OR 97361, USA Email: hendersj@wou.edu Perceptions of teen pregnancy among high school students in Sweet Home, Oregon Tim Little, Jessica Henderson, Peggy Pedersen and Linda Stonecipher Western Oregon University, Monmouth, USA Abstract Background: The purpose of this study was to gain insights into the perceptions and attitudes about teen pregnancy among high school students in a rural area with high teen pregnancy rates. Methods: Five focus groups were conducted with: (1) females in 9th–10th grades; (2) females in 11th–12th grades; (3) males in 9th–10th grades; (4) males in 11th–12th grades; and (5) pregnant/parenting females in 9th–12th grades. Results: Common themes among the students were that: (1) the number of teen pregnancies was increasing and was a growing concern; (2) financial difficulties and harm to education were associated with teen pregnancies; (3) teen females had many reasons for wanting a baby, but teen males just wanted to have sex; and (4) pregnancy happened by chance, or was simply an inadvertent consequence of having sex. Conclusions: To reduce teen pregnancy, the developmental asset model offers community members, teachers and parents guidelines to work together to develop key assets in youth that may protect against risky sexual behaviours. Keywords teen pregnancy, Developmental Asset Model, sex education Introduction Sex education has been an important part of the health curriculum in American schools for decades, yet unplanned teen pregnancies remain a major public health concern. About one in three American females become pregnant before the age of 19 1 . The birth rate among teenagers 15–19 years old increased by 3 per cent in 2006 2 . Teen moms are less likely to complete high school, and they and their infants
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aa-36 - Health Education Journal http:/hej.sagepub.com/...

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