intro_to_geo_18 - Earthquake cont. and Crustal deformation...

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Earthquake cont. and Crustal deformation Predicting earthquake Long-term earthquake predictions are made on the basis of recorded earthquake occurrences Within a designated time span, higher probabilities of future earthquakes are assigned to regions that have historically been seismically active, and to smaller earthquakes as compared to large earthquakes in any one particular region More specifically, within belts of seismicity, seismic gaps (sections within seismically active belts that have not experienced as many recent earthquakes) may be “due” for an earthquake Recurrence interval Short-term predictions are generally unreliable, but swarms of small earthquakes and sudden deformation of rock (perhaps evidenced by a change in the water table) may forebode an earthquake to come A recurrence interval is the average (expected) waiting time between earthquakes of a given magnitude (or greater) for a particular region. It is assessed using evidence of past earthquake activity (mostly from seismogram records)
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2011 for the course GEOL 2001 taught by Professor Babaie during the Winter '09 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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intro_to_geo_18 - Earthquake cont. and Crustal deformation...

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