intro_to_geol_11

intro_to_geol_11 - Volcanic rocks and Sedimentary rocks The...

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Volcanic rocks and Sedimentary rocks The Long Valley Caldera, near the Sierra Nevada Mountains, exploded about 700,000 years ago and produced an immense ash fall called the Bishop Tuff About 30 km to the northwest lies Mono Lake, with an island in the middle and a string of craters extending south from its south shore Hot springs and tufa deposits can be found along the lake You can see the lake on Google Earth™ at Lat 37° 59' 56.58'' N Long 119° 2' 18.2'' W The depression known as Mono Lake formed as a volcanic caldera with its floor beneath the local water table. Its islands and nearby domes imply resurgent volcanic activity; the area is potentially subject to future volcanic hazards Earth not unique in having volcanoes The largest known is an extinct shield volcano, Olympus Mons, found on Mars The most volcanically active body in the solar system is Io, a moon of Jupiter Sedimentary rocks Although rare in the crust as a whole, sediments and sedimentary rocks dominate
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intro_to_geol_11 - Volcanic rocks and Sedimentary rocks The...

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