lecture_5 - Lecture Notes: Lecture 4 HOUSE FINCH EXAMPLE...

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HOUSE FINCH EXAMPLE Males range from red to yellow Red males produce more young per season Red males are not dominant to yellow males Females prefer to mate with red males Red males feed offspring more (Red color is a sexually selected trait driven by female choice. Potentially honest signal) EASTERN BLUEBIRD EXAMPLE Males and females similar color – males much brighter Nest in cavities – limited resource Males acquire and defend a territory Mate choice experiment – females do not choose males based on color Nesting experiment – bluer males get to nest first and choose the best territories Is this male-male competition or female choice driven sexual selection? Why do we always talk about sexual selection in terms of male ornaments? Males are more often the larger, more ornamented sex. Females often have to care for young and should be less conspicuous. This is not always the case though. Why are some females ornamented then, and what is the function of female
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2011 for the course POUL 3123 taught by Professor Navara during the Spring '09 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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lecture_5 - Lecture Notes: Lecture 4 HOUSE FINCH EXAMPLE...

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