lecture_4 - What is a microsatellite?...

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What is a microsatellite? "Microsatellites" are defined as loci (or regions within DNA sequences) where short sequences of DNA (nucleotides ; adenine - A, thiamine - T, guanine - G, cytosine - C) are repeated in tandem arrays. This means that the sequences are repeated one right after the other. The lengths of sequences used most often are di-, tri-, or tetra-nucleotides. An example of a locus containing mixed lengths of repeats may be viewed by clicking here. This example contains a stretch of di-nucleotides (AC) that changes into a tri-nucleotide (CAA) repeat. What makes microsatellites useful is the fact that at the same location within the genomic DNA the number of times the sequence (ex. AC) is repeated often varies between individuals, within populations, and/or between species. So one population may commonly have 13 AC's repeated in a row while another population has 18 AC's repeated at the same location within the genomic DNA. Different regions of the DNA contain sequences that mutate at various rates. Some regions have a high rate of mutation while others have a low rate of change. In areas of the genome with high rates of mutation there is a wider range in the number of repeats found within individuals of a population
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2011 for the course POUL 3123 taught by Professor Navara during the Spring '09 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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lecture_4 - What is a microsatellite?...

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