Attachment+and+the+Biochemistry+of+Cuddling

Attachment+and+the+Biochemistry+of+Cuddling - When Caroline...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Attachment and the Biochemistry of Cuddling
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Caroline’s Two Grandmothers When Caroline was a newborn, her mother carried her everywhere in a baby sling. Caroline could breastfeed whenever she needed to, and she could sleep comfortably next to the warmth of her mother’s body. At night, Caroline slept on one side of her mother while her father slept on the other side. Caroline’s Tibetan grandmother smiled with pleasure when she saw how Caroline was being raised. “It is like that in my country” she said. “It is the best way to be a mother.” Caroline’s American grandmother was not so sure. She was afraid that Caroline might become “spoiled.” What do you think?
Background image of page 2
Can babies be “spoiled”? The idea that a baby can become “spoiled” by too much cuddling dates back to an earlier time in the US when it was believed that discipline had to begin at birth. In actuality, babies need the warmth and reassurance of being carried about and cuddled. They benefit from having their needs met quickly and not experiencing the frustration of crying for long periods. Babies who have their needs met early on are calmer, happier, and cry less. Breastfeeding and sleeping near the baby are two ways to provide security. Carrying the baby helps integrate the baby into a normal part of the mother’s life and makes the care of the baby seem more natural and less stressful.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Cultural Traditions In many cultures, it is traditional to carry infants everywhere in slings, for safety reasons and for ease of breastfeeding and care. In the USA and other developed countries, it has not been a tradition. In Papua New Guinea, infants are never allowed to crawl, but are carried by the mother or by siblings or other relatives until the age of one year, when most are able to walk. This is done to prevent infants from picking up diseases on the ground and becoming infected from dirty hands. In other cultures, such as the Mayan and Thai cultures,
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 15

Attachment+and+the+Biochemistry+of+Cuddling - When Caroline...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online