Imaginary+Companions,+Make-Believe+Play,+and+Self-talk

Imaginary+Companions,+Make-Believe+Play,+and+Self-talk -...

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Imaginary Companions, Make-Believe  Play, and Self-talk  in Early Childhood Dr. Leilani Brown
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Jake the Lion comes to Dinner When Joey was four years old he  began positioning an extra chair at  the table for Jake, the lion who was  his imaginary friend. Joey was 9  years old before he stopped publicly   including Jake in his life. Sometimes, at night, Joey s mother  still hears him whispering to Jake  before going to sleep.  Is something  wrong with Joey?
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Imaginary Companions According to research, imaginary companions like Jake the  lion are normal and indicate that children are intelligent,  have good memories, and are capable of great imagination. Some children have hundreds of imaginary companions.  Others may have only one or two and include them in  daily life, like a sibling.
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Imaginary Companions are Normal  in Early Childhood and Beyond Children are most likely to have an imaginary playmate in  early childhood. Most often the imaginary playmate is the same age and  gender, but may or may not be human. Recent research indicates that many older children, such  as 10-year-olds, still have their imaginary companions but  no longer talk openly about them. This too, is normal.
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Different Treatments Children tend to treat invisible companions as  equals. They tend to treat stuffed animal companions like  children and they assume the parental role. Children may have several imaginary companions  and treat each differently.
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Winnie the Pooh Winnie the Pooh,Tigger, Piglet, Kanga, Roo, Owl, and Rabbit were  the actual stuffed animals belonging to Christopher Robin Milne. His father, A.A. Milne, wrote theWinnie the Pooh  stories for his 
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2011 for the course FAMR 230 taught by Professor Brown,l during the Spring '08 term at University of Hawaii, Manoa.

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Imaginary+Companions,+Make-Believe+Play,+and+Self-talk -...

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