javascriptlogging.pdf - The Scalyr Guide to Getting Started Logging as Quickly as Possible PREFACE You probably didn\u2019t get into programming with

javascriptlogging.pdf - The Scalyr Guide to Getting Started...

This preview shows page 1 - 5 out of 25 pages.

Image of page 1
The Scalyr Guide to Getting Started Logging as Quickly as Possible
Image of page 2
You probably didn’t get into programming with dreams of logging. That may seem like an inauspicious beginning to a book about logging. But it’s true, and it’s important to mention. People get into programming because they want to build robots or design video games. And once in the industry, they take different jobs for the opportunity to do things that are new and shiny, like doing stuff with blockchain or the JavaScript framework of the week. But robust application logging? Alongside unit testing and fixing the build, developers tend to view these things as the kale and floss of the industry. And that creates an unfortunate blind spot. Logging is important. But beyond that, it’s also interesting. Yes, you read that correctly. Logging is interesting. To understand exactly how, you need to understand the state of the art, as opposed to how you’ve probably viewed it, historically. Historically, logs are a bummer. They’re these giant walls of inscrutable text that your OS burps out with monotonous regularity. Ideally, you’d never ever look at one. And that’s because if you are looking at one, something is deeply wrong. Maybe it’s a misbehaving device driver causing your webcam not to work. Or perhaps some important app or the OS itself keeps crashing. Whatever the case, there you sit, browser open to some dusty old troubleshooting website, searching a log file for some random string in a long- shot prayer that this will lead to the root problem. This was not how you wanted to spend your Saturday. You just wanted to video chat with a friend. The log file thus serves as the avatar of unexpected frustration—the thing you look at when something that always worked suddenly becomes a problem. This didn’t just define the individual experience, either. Take your own production software. Writing the code involves fun things like architecture, design patterns, frameworks, and creativity. Then the code winds up in production, in maintenance mode. And maintenance mode involves midnight phone calls, angry customers, firefighting, and yes, you guessed it: log files. This mindset and attitude toward log files calcified during the decades where departments distinguished between programmers, maintenance programmers, and operations. Programmers rolled their eyes and added logging code grudgingly because it was a “best practice” (and because PREFACE The Scalyr Guide to Getting Started Logging as Quickly as Possible 3
Image of page 3
the architect forced them to do it). Operations and maintenance programmers consumed the log files, responding to midnight phone calls by looking for needles in haphazard haystacks. But the software world no longer works this way. Movements like agile, lean, and DevOps have broken down traditional silos. And even if you’re not a big believer in all or any of these movements, your management probably is. You’re now just as likely to consume a log file as you are to write the code that puts stuff in one.
Image of page 4
Image of page 5

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 25 pages?

  • Spring '15
  • Logarithm, Data logger

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes