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Resume_basics - Resume basics For much more detail please...

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Resume basics For much more detail, please check Laura Brown’s annotated resume!! A couple of over-arching points: 1. Readers know that you’re presenting your strengths. So don’t feel that you need to include a complete chronology or every detail as you might with an application. That said, every single piece of information on your resume needs to be true. Up to 40% of people misrepresent themselves on their resumes which is why US companies spend about $2 BILLION / year on fact- checking. It’s rarely possible to recover your credibility if you’re caught embellishing the truth. 2. Unlike a cover letter, which generally needs to be written “fresh” for each position you apply for, you can usually have just one or two resumes that target specific types of jobs. For example, I have one resume for academic positions and one for corporate/consulting positions. But keep them updated obviously, your work history will change. And so should your references and activities. Eventually (and maybe even now) yo u’ll put Experience before Education. 3. Visual appeal and attention to detail matter here like they rarely will elsewhere. 4. One page or two? Ahhh, that pesky decision. For career fairs, it makes sense to go in with a one-pager, but even then, the decision is situation-dependent. Of course, most readers say they prefer a one-pager they’re busy people and there can be 100s of documents to sift through. But, if you go back and check on who got the interview, it’s likely to be someone with a two -pager, even without including references. They simply have stronger, more competitive qualifications. 5. How far back should you go? What if activities and jobs aren’t career -related. Again, think strategically and work with what you have, knowing it ’ll change. If you’re a junior in college and have only been a lifeguard or a camp counselor or a clerk at Food Lion or XXI, so be it. It’s better to put that, knowing that you need to emphasize accomplishments, than to have nothing at all. ANY job that you had as a teen-ager or in part- time work during college shows that you’re dependable, can manage your time, can work well as a team member, etc. Ditto for high school honors and activities they need to be significant though, like valedictorian, or an all-state athlete, or a club president. But again, something is better than nothing That said, you won’t be able to use these kinds of jobs and activities much longer.
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