October_1

October_1 - More inclined to agree with you When you create...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
COM 204 1-Oct-2009 Kenneth Burke (1931) Most important rhetoric theorist in the 20 th Century Connected literary criticism to rhetorical criticism Argued balance between form and information Contrast between FORM and INFORMATION Form o Creation and satisfaction of an appetite in the reader/hearer o Brings enjoyment Ex: Sitcoms, ‘The New Yorker’, music You get “sucked in”; inclined to watch/listen repeatedly Information o Relies more heavily on facts o Once consume it is no longer interesting Ex: reality TV, USA Today, e-mails Once you know the outcome you don’t want to read/watch it again Believe ceremonial rhetoric is a step towards persuasion
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: More inclined to agree with you When you create an argument, you tailor the argument to universal audience Bitzer (1968) Rhetorical situation o Exigencydefect that can be fixed with rhetoric o Audience o Constraints Gearhart (1979) Feminist All rhetoric is masculine and offensive o Needs to be destroyed Fass & Griffin Invitational rhetoric o Speaker would invite/ask for feedback Cheney (1991) from Purdue Organizational rhetoric o One person speaking to many (not true anymore) COM 204 1-Oct-2009 Even though it is convenient, it still messes up on who is involved...
View Full Document

Page1 / 2

October_1 - More inclined to agree with you When you create...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online