{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

qualitativeana2

qualitativeana2 - 1 Sarah Haddaoui Biology Sci Writing...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Sarah Haddaoui Biology Sci Writing Introduction: Qualitative analysis is used in the determination of the identity of a substance. It is different from quantitative analysis, which deals with the determination of the amount of a substance. In this experiment, qualitative analysis techniques were used to determine whether or not a sample contains a certain ion. When using this method, an unknown and a reactant were mixed. The result of the reaction led to a conclusion about the presence or absence of certain ions in the unknown. Many ions react in similar ways, and although the addition of one reagent to an unknown may not identify the ion, it limits the possibilities as to what the ion could be. For this experiment, the unknown contained all of the following cations and anions: Ag + , Cl - , Ba 2+ , SO 4 2- , Fe 3+ , PO 4 3- , Cu 2+ , and Cr 3+ . The following reagents were used to identify the ions: 1M H 2 SO 4 , 2M HCl, 2M NH 4 OH, 2M NaOH, .1M Ba(NO 3 ), .1M AgNO 3 (labeled as .1M Ag + ). The first four were used to identify the cations, and the last two, used in conjunction with the first four, were used to identify the anions. The identification of the ions was mainly based on solubility. That meant that something must have been known about the solubility characteristics of the different ions in the presence of the available reagents. The point of the experiment was to learn which reagents would cause the ions to form precipitates, and which reagents dissolve the precipitates formed by the ions.
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
2 Materials and Method: Figure 1.1
Image of page 2
3 Figure 1.2 The first part of the experiment consisted of reacting the cations and anions with the reagents in order to see what the reaction will result in (precipitate or no precipitate).
Image of page 3

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern