Transition_Metal_Chemistry_and_Coordination_Compounds_-_PART_A

Transition_Metal_Chemistry_and_Coordination_Compounds_-_PART_A

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 4/9/11 Transition Metal Chemistry and Coordination Compounds Chapter 22
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4/9/11 Transition Metal Chemistry and Coordination Compounds Properties of Transition Metals (focus on TMs in the 3d row). Chemistry of Iron and Copper Coordination Compounds Structure of Coordination Compounds Bonding in Coordination Compounds: Crystal Field Theory Reactions of Coordination Compounds
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4/9/11 22. The Transition Metals Characteristically have incomplete d-orbital subshells that give rise to partially filled d-orbital subshells
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4/9/11 Properties of the Transition Metals TMs typically have incompletely filled d subshells or readily give rise to ions with incompletely filled d subshells. Gp 2B have an s2d10 configuration and are not included in TM series. L to R; atomic numbers increase in outer shell, and as protons are added it lends to increasing nuclear charge. With increasing nuclear charge, ionic radius decreases Ionization energies increase as electronegativities increase
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4/9/11 22.
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4/9/11 Most have a close-packed structure giving each TM atom a (solid-state, 0 ox. #) coordination number of 12 (each metal atom is in contact with 6 others in its own plane and with 3 additional metal atoms above its plane and 3 below its plane). Strong metallic bonds occur as a result of closest-packed structure and a relatively small atomic radius. Results in high densities, mp’s, bp’s, heats of fusion and vaporization. General Physical Properties of Transition Metals
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4/9/11 22.
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4/9/11 Oxidation States of Transition Metals When first row TMs form cations, electrons are removed first from the 4s orbital then from the 3d orbitals (for Mn 4s23d5: Mn+2 is 3d5 and not 4s23d3). Common oxidation states for third row TMs are +2 and +3 Highest oxidation state is Mn+7 4s23d5 [Ar] + 7e - TMs usually exhibit their highest oxidation number in compounds with very electronegative elements, i.e. O & F
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Oxidation States of the 1st Row Transition Metals ( most stable oxidation numbers are shown in red ) 22. s2d1
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Transition_Metal_Chemistry_and_Coordination_Compounds_-_PART_A

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