lecture_2 - Chapter 2 Water Physical properties of water...

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Chapter 2 Water • Physical properties of water tructure of water Structure of water – Water as a solvent ydrophobic effect – Hydrophobic effect – Osmosis and diffusion • Chemical properties of water – Ionization of water – Acid-base chemistry – Buffers 1
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Water – the chemical of life 1. Nearly all biological molecules assume their shapes (and functions) in response to the physical and chemical properties of the surrounding water molecules 2. Most biochemical reactions happen in water many cases water is directly involved in the 3. In many cases, water is directly involved in the catalytic reaction(s) (H+, HO-) 4. The production of O 2 from water and CO 2 is a fundamental process in plant biochemistry 2
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Structure of a water molecule he structure of a water molecule is classified as “ ENT” The structure of a water molecule is classified as BENT If you consider the lone pairs of electrons, the geometry is “Tetrahedral” -0.66e - +0.33e +0.33e + + 3
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A hydrogen-bond between two water molecules The oxygen atom in water has four sp 3 hybrid orbitals Two for the lone pairs and two for the hydrogens H-bond acceptor ca. 1.8 Å +0.33e + ond donor 66e H-bond donor -0.66e - 4 This is 0.8 Å closer than the sum of the H (1.2 Å) and O (1.4 Å) VDW radii which would be 2.6 Å
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The structure of ice Each water molecule in ice is participating in four H-bonds – one for each of e two hydrogen atoms the two hydrogen atoms (donors) and two for each
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2011 for the course BCHS 3304 taught by Professor Johnson during the Spring '08 term at University of Houston.

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lecture_2 - Chapter 2 Water Physical properties of water...

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