Set1.Dr._Wilson_MCDB1A.2010

Set1.Dr._Wilson_MCDB1A.2010 - Ch. 5 Opener 1 A New Heart...

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Unformatted text preview: Ch. 5 Opener 1 A New Heart Cell Cell Structure and Function: a new heart cell Cell Structure and Function L. Wilson Ofce Hours: LSB 1119 Mon, Wed 3 PM - 4 PM E-mail: wilson@lifesci.ucsb.edu Lecture Schedule Oct 18, 20 Cells, Cell theory, Cell size, Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes, Cell organelles Oct 19 Midterm I Material covered by Dr. Feinstein Oct 22, 25, 26 The Cytoskeleton, Membranes and the Endo- membrane System, Cell Junctions Oct 27, 29 Chromatin, Chromosomes, Cell Cycle Nov 1, 2 Mitosis, Cytokinesis Nov 3 Meiosis Nov 5 Gametogenesis and Fertilization Nov 8 Principles of Early Development Nov 9 Neural Development (Lecture by Dr. Feinstein) Nov 10 Midterm II (material covered by Dr. Wilson) Assigned Required Reading Chapter Assigned Pages 5: The organization of cells 76-104, also, Ch 26, 536-542 6: Membrane Systems; Functions in Cells 96-127 11: Chromosomes, cell cycle, cell division 209-235 43: Spermatogeneis, oogenesis, fertilization 902-906 19: Early Development; Stem Cells 405-415 44: Early Development; Stages 922-942 Life, The Science of Biology, 9 th Edition Figure 5.1 The Scale of Life (Part 1) An early Optical Microscope built by Robert Hooke Robert Hooke, cork cell walls- mid 1600s!! Fig 1.2; 9 th Edition Figure 5.3 Looking at Cells (Part 1) Figure 4.3 Looking at Cells (Part 2) An Electron Microscope See text, Fig 5.3 9 th Edition Figure 5.3 Looking at Cells (Part 3) Cell Theory-Formulated by Schleiden and Schwann in 1838- the frst uniying theory o biology All living organisms are composed o cells Cells are the smallest units that can sustain lie Cells are the main structural and unctional units o lie All cells arise by division o pre-existing cells (lie cannot arise spontaneously) Louis Pasteur (1664) asked: Can life arise spontaneously or must in come from previous life? There are limits to how large cells can become Cells must be small- their size is limited by the process of diffusion This process is responsible for the movement of molecules through the cytoplasm and in and out of cells Figure 5.2 Why Cells Are Small Living organisms can be: unicellular (single cells) most life processes and functions take place within the conFnes of a single cell multicellular (the individual consists of many cells) Figure 26.1 The Three Domains of the Living World The Three Domains of Life ~ 3.5 billion years ago The three domains form two major groups- based on how the cells are organized Prokaryotes (bacteria, archaea) Eukaryotes (yeasts, protists, plants, animals, etc) Major characteristics of prokaryotic organisms Always unicellular (many shapes) Figure 26.2 Bacterial Cell Shapes Major characteristics of prokaryotic organisms There is no nucleus- the DNA is found in a region of the cytoplasm called a nucleoid Figure 5.4 A Prokaryotic Cell Major characteristics of Prokaryotes Prokaryotic organisms Plasma membrane is encased in a rigid cell wall Figure 5.4 A Prokaryotic Cell Major characteristics of Prokaryotes Some prokaryotes have specialized internal or external structures Internal membrane folds Flagellae ( fagellum, sing.) Pili (pilus, sing.) Internal membrane structures For photosynthesis Many prokaryotes swim by means of long whip-like projections, called fagellae Prokaryotic organisms...
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2011 for the course MCDB 1a taught by Professor Feinstein during the Fall '08 term at UCSB.

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Set1.Dr._Wilson_MCDB1A.2010 - Ch. 5 Opener 1 A New Heart...

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