7 - Databases

7 - Databases - TomorrowsTechnology andYou...

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Tomorrow’s Technology  and You  Chapter 7   Database Applications and  Privacy Implications  Slid e 1
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What Good Is a Database? Database  a collection of information stored in an  organized form in a computer Typically composed of one or more tables  A collection of related information A collection of records Database Software Application software (like word processing and spreadsheet software) Designed to maintain databases (collections of information) Slide 2
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 Database Advantages Advantages offered by computerized  databases:  Make it easier to store large quantities of  information  Make it easier to retrieve information  quickly and flexibly  Make it easy to organize and reorganize  information  Make it easy to print and distribute  information in a variety of ways  Slide 3
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Database Development Before you develop a database to  store data and generate information,  ask the following questions: 1) Why is the database needed? 2) Who will use the database? 3) What types of questions should the  database be able to answer? 4) What incentives will be available for  those that provide data to the database? http://www.vcrlter.virginia.edu/dimes/presentations/PORTER/SCIDB97/sld01
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Database Basics A record is the information relating to  one person, product, or event. Each discrete piece of information in a  record is a field. Slide 5 Field Record Table
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Database Basics SQL (Structured Query Language) Most modern database management programs  support a standard language for programming  complex queries called SQL ( Structured Query  Language). SQL is available for many database management  systems. Programmers and sophisticated users don’t need to  learn new languages when they work with new systems. The graphical user interfaces allow point-and-click  queries that insulate users from the complexities of the  query language. Slide 6
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From File Managers to Database Management Systems File manager enables users to work with one file at a  time   Database management system  (DBMS)  manipulates data in a large collection of  files, cross-referencing between files as  needed Slid e 7
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2011 for the course CNIT 136 taught by Professor Chad during the Spring '11 term at Purdue.

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7 - Databases - TomorrowsTechnology andYou...

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