Social+Inequality - American Schooling: Past, Present, and...

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American Schooling: Past, Present, and Future Professor Conchas, Ph.D.
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2 Jefferson’s legacy--education as the foundation of democracy Creative and rational thought is  democracy’s cornerstone All citizens need basic literacy, the  talented need far more The common good must be balanced  with individual liberty Racial differences require social and  political distinction
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3 Horace Mann’s legacy--the common school as “great equalizer” common curriculum in a common place knowledge and habits of citizenship, as  well as the basic literacy the “creator of wealth undreamed of”-- eliminate poverty and crime shape the destiny of a wise, productive  country. 
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4 Ever increasing 20th- century expectations 1900-- cultural preservation--Americanizing immigrants 1910--workforce preparation--staffing the factories 1950--national security--beating the Russians in space 1960--the “great society”--eliminating poverty and  segregation 1980--economic competitiveness--beating the  Japanese; first in the world in math and science 2000--“Leave No Child Behind”--creating a more  literate domestic workforce in a global economy where  unskilled work can be “outsourced”
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5 Sociological theory in the early  20th century--explaining school’s  social role Structural theories of how society works Durkheim (functionalism)  Weber (bureaucracy and technical rationality) Cultural beliefs, values, norms  Social Darwinism--racial inferiority  IQ--innate, immutable  An ideology of progress Increasing social harmony Expanding opportunity 
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6 Functionalist & bureaucratic ideas of a productive & harmonious industrial society Society is an organic whole that requires the integration of all  Integration and harmony require shared values Advanced, complex societies require that technical skills be  differentiated, specialized, and coordinated into rational, goal  oriented bureaucracies Hierarchy of authority  Impersonality  Written rules of conduct  Promotion based on achievement  Specialized division of labor  Efficiency 
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7 Functionalist & bureaucratic views of schooling in a complex industrial society Social cohesion:  brings together  all  community’s children for  a core civic education, respectful relations, solidarity Social goal attainment:  education provides differentiated  Social fluidity:  education is the means to realizing more  equitable distribution of social status and economic resources  across generations  Economic rewards follow from differences in level of technical skill 
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This note was uploaded on 04/10/2011 for the course EDUCATION 124 taught by Professor Conchas during the Spring '11 term at UC Irvine.

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Social+Inequality - American Schooling: Past, Present, and...

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