socialcapital - Social Capital: Mexican and Vietnamese High...

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Social Capital: Mexican and Vietnamese High School Youth October 26, 2004 Education 124 Professor Conchas
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Fact Unequal resources generate disparity in school achievement School and family resources are considered necessary for positive educational outcomes Useful resources may be evident, like financial support
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Social Capital Or, resources could be less tangible, such as norms, encouragement, and information gained from relationships and social networks These less tangible resources have been called “ SOCIAL CAPITAL .” Social Capital are the resources obtained through relationships and social networks
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Social Capital In sum, social capital is the information, support, and supervision that closely-knit networks of relationships provide.
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Who Supplies Social Capital: Family? Many researchers who study social capital consider the family to be the most important supplier of it for children research on social capital focuses on the influence that parents, through their connections with children, schools, and other parents, have on the educational achievement of the general school population
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Non-Familial Social Capital However, parents are not the only sources of children’s social capital. Children spend large portions of their days in settings without their parents. Sources of “non-familial” social capital include friends, teachers and other school officials, and communities. Ignoring these non-familial sources of social capital is problematic because discrepancies in children’s educational outcomes are attributed solely to the actions of parents without researchers also scrutinizing the practices of schools and communities.
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Comparing Two Racialized Groups Mexican Americans and Vietnamese Americans provide an interesting comparison because these groups are socioeconomically and demographically
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This note was uploaded on 04/10/2011 for the course EDUCATION 124 taught by Professor Conchas during the Spring '11 term at UC Irvine.

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socialcapital - Social Capital: Mexican and Vietnamese High...

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