Bio Unit 1.1 Discussion

Bio Unit 1.1 Discussion - As a public health researcher I...

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As a public health researcher, I find this topic to be particularly interesting. Before addressing the specific theories that underlie the association between soft drinks and osteoporosis and tooth decay, I thought it would be worthwhile to first discuss some studies that have shown this association. In particular, I wanted to present the class with the work completed by Grace Wyshak and colleagues (1994; 2000) from the Harvard School of Public Health. Two of her studies are some of the most widely cited studies in this field. One of Wyshak’s earlier studies was published as early as 1994, which makes it somewhat shocking that we are just now catching on to the ill-effects of soft drinks within this decade. In fact, Wyshak published an even earlier study in 1989 demonstrating similar findings. Anyway, in their cross-sectional study (data collected at one point in time; e.g., a survey) of 76 girls and 51 boys, Wyshak and Frisch (1994) found that girls who were 3.59 times more likely to experience a bone fracture if they consumed more than 0.7 servings of cola beverages a day. This association persisted even
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Bio Unit 1.1 Discussion - As a public health researcher I...

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