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Particle agglutination

Particle agglutination - Agglutination vs Precipitation...

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Agglutination Insoluble or particulate Ag or Ab Ag must have at least two determinants Ag excess results in postzone reaction Ab excess results in prozone reactions Reaction time: minutes to hours Test results: qualitative or semiquantitative Precipitation Soluble Ag & Ab Ag must have at least two determinants Ag excess results in postzone reaction Ab excess results in prozone reactions Reaction time: hours to days Test results: qualitative, semi quantitative or quantitative Agglutination vs. Precipitation
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Rheumatoid Factor RF is not an indication of Rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
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In latex agglutination procedures, an antibody (or antigen) coats the surface of latex particles (sensitized latex). When a sample containing the specific antigen (or antibody) is mixed with the milky-appearing sensitized latex, it causes visible agglutination (Fig. 1). The degree of agglutination plotted as a function of agglutinant concentration follows a bell-shape curve similar to the precipitin one. Latex particles are used to magnify the
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