Elisa - The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which...

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The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), principally attacks T-4 lymphocytes, a vital part of the human immune system. As a result, the body’s ability to resist opportunistic viral, bacterial, fungal, protozoal, and other infection is greatly weakened. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia is the leading cause of death among people with HIV infection, but the incidence of certain types of cancers such as B-cell lymphomas and Kaposi’s sarcoma is also increased. Neurological complications and dramatic weight loss, or “wasting,” are characteristic of endstage HIV disease (AIDS). HIV can be transmitted sexually, through contact with contaminated blood, tissue, or needles, and from mother to child during birth or breast-feeding. Full-blown symptoms of AIDS may not develop for more than 10 years after infection.
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HIV is a retrovirus that begins its infection cycle by recognizing and binding to CD4 proteins on the surfaces of uninfected T-helper
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This note was uploaded on 04/10/2011 for the course BIOL 4202 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at North Texas.

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Elisa - The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which...

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