ByzantiumandWesternEuropeLecture_084414

ByzantiumandWesternEuropeLecture_084414 - Byzantium and...

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Byzantium and Western Europe Byzantium and Western Europe to 1000 C.E. to 1000 C.E. World History Mr. Bsharah
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Introduction Orthodox (Greek) “having the right opinion” Early Middle Ages marks birth of Europe New ideas and experimentation Unique combination of Graeco-Roman culture Germanic culture Evolving Christianity Threat from Islamic world Western Europe increasingly isolated Lost touch with classical learning
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End of Western Roman Empire Threats Visigoths under Alaric sack Rome – 410 Huns under Attila invade Italy – 452 Vandals overrun Rome – 455 Odovacar – 434-493 Deposed Romulus Augustulus in 476 Odovacar recognized by Byzantine Zeno Western empire completely overrun by barbarians
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Romans and Barbarians Fall of Rome did not mean end of Rome Barbarian tribes borrow from Rome Germanic institutions coexist with Roman law Roman government Latin Visigoths, Ostrogoths, Vandals entered the empire as Arian Christians Franks converted to Catholicism Roman traditions remained the stronger tradition
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Byzantine Empire Eastern Roman empire survives Constantinople – capital Justinian – r. 527-565 Theodora “One God, one empire, one religion” Corpus Juris Civilis Foundation for most European law Goal was to centralize government Impose legal and doctrinal conformity
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Byzantine Empire (cont.) Religion also served to centralize Close ties between emperors and patriarchs Large number of Jews Legal protection Empire’s strength was its 1500 cities Constantinople – population of 350,000 Cultural crossroads of Europe and Asia Decurions – councils of wealthy landowners
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This note was uploaded on 04/12/2011 for the course HIST 1050 taught by Professor Fuhrmann during the Spring '07 term at North Texas.

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ByzantiumandWesternEuropeLecture_084414 - Byzantium and...

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