Lecture5_075050

Lecture5_075050 - Muscle Physiology October 21, 2010 Muscle...

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Muscle Physiology October 21, 2010
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Muscle Functions Production of movement Locomotion, manipulation Movement of fluid through hollow organs Maintenance of posture Skeletal muscle Stabilization of joints Skeletal muscle Generation of heat Skeletal muscle, body temperature homeostasis
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Types of muscle Skeletal, Cardiac, Smooth Although structurally and functionally distinct, they can be classified in two different ways Striated or Unstriated Striated (skeletal and cardiac) Unstriated (smooth) Voluntary or Involuntary Voluntary—innervated by somatic nervous system (skeletal) Involuntary—innervated by autonomic nervous system (cardiac and smooth)
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Muscle Tissue Characteristics Excitability or irritability = the ability to respond to a stimulus Contractility = the ability to shorten Extensibility = the ability to lengthen beyond its resting length Elasticity = the ability to return to its original resting length after being stretched
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Muscle Key Words General terms Myo-, Mys-, Sarco-, Fibers Skeletal Striated, Voluntary Cardiac Striated, Involuntary Smooth Visceral, Non-striated, Involuntary
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Structure of skeletal muscle A single skeletal muscle cell is known as a muscle fiber Relatively large, elongated, and cylinder-shaped A muscle consists of a number of muscle fibers lying parallel to each other and bundled together by connective tissue Fibers usually extend the entire length of the muscle
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Structure of a skeletal muscle Nerve fiber for each muscle fiber Blood vessels Highly metabolic Connective tissue
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Muscle Anatomy Epimysium Dense irregular CT Continuous with other sheaths and with tendons
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Muscle Anatomy Fascicle Bundle of muscle fibers Perimysium Fibrous CT covering of fascicle
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Muscle Anatomy Elongated, striated, multinucleate Endomysium Fine sheath CT with reticular fibers
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Parallel and Series Elastic Components Contractile component : This is the part of muscle composed of thick and thin filaments. Formation of crossbridges, utilizing ATP, develops active force Parallel elastic component : These are the connective tissues within the muscle (e.g. epimysium, perimusium and endomysium) Series elastic component : These are the connective tissues within the tendon.
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Skeletal Muscle Fiber Sarcolemma Plasma membrane Sarcoplasm Cytoplasm Glycosomes Myoglobin Myofibrils Sarcoplasmic reticulum
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Myofibrils Myofibrils are the predominant structural feature of skeletal muscle fiber (make up 80% of the volume of the muscle fiber) Parallel cylindrical intracellular structures that extend the length of the fiber Each consists of a regular arrangement of thick (myosin) and thin (actin) filaments
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Alternating dark bands (A bands) and light bands (I bands) All the bands lined up parallel give skeletal muscle its striations
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This note was uploaded on 04/12/2011 for the course BIOL 1020 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at North Texas.

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Lecture5_075050 - Muscle Physiology October 21, 2010 Muscle...

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