PP10.ppt intro

PP10.ppt intro - Intro Chapter 10: Gender and Sexuality...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Intro Chapter 10: Gender and Sexuality
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Some Definitions Sex—the biological category of male or female; sexual intercourse Gender—cultural, social, and psychological meanings associated with masculinity or femininity Gender roles—behaviors, attitudes, and personality traits designated either masculine or feminine in a given culture Gender identity—A person’s psychological sense of being male or female Sexual orientation—direction of a person's emotional and erotic attractions
Background image of page 2
Gender Role Stereotypes The beliefs and expectations people hold about the typical characteristics, preferences, and behaviors of men and women In the US, when men and women accept the female stereotype more positively than the male stereotype, “benevolent sexism” results. Contributes to gender inequality. There is a high degree of agreement on the characteristics associated with each sex among people of many different cultures (Williams, 1999; Best, 2001).
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Gender Related Differences Differences do not mean deficiencies Overall: men and women more similar than different Three main areas of gender differences Personality Cognitive abilities Sexual attitudes and behaviors
Background image of page 4
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Personality Differences No significant differences between men and women have been found on most characteristics Women tend to be more nurturant than men Men tend to be more assertive than women
Background image of page 6
Cognitive Differences No differences for most cognitive abilities Verbal, reading, and writing—females consistently score higher Spatial skills—males outscore females on mentally rotating objects, females score better on remembering locations of objects Math Skills—males score slightly better than females but the average difference very small (Georgiou, 2007)
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Sexual Attitudes and Behaviors Reported differences between males and females in these areas have become less pronounced since the 1960s Recent meta-analyses indicate that men tend to have more sexual partners, experience first intercourse at an earlier age, and masturbate more frequently than women.
Background image of page 8
Gender Role Development Between ages 2-3 years, children can identify themselves and other children as boys or girls. The concept of gender or sex, however, is based
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/12/2011 for the course PSYC 1630 taught by Professor Watkins during the Spring '08 term at North Texas.

Page1 / 31

PP10.ppt intro - Intro Chapter 10: Gender and Sexuality...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online