lewis-structures

lewis-structures - 2peripheralLewisbondedtoacentralLewis...

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2 peripheral Lewis’ bonded to a central Lewis
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Skeletal structures Skeletal structures Because there are exceptions to the octet rule, we need a set of rules to determine how many electrons surround atoms The first step is to determine how the atoms are bonded in a molecule Generally, if there is only one of one element and multiple copies of another element, the unique element is central Commonly, H is peripheral, bonded to O Read 7.6 (pg. 236) up to PE5. Do PE5.
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Counting total electrons Counting total electrons Once we have determined the basic structure of the molecule we can start placing electrons around atoms The first step is to determine the total number of electrons that are available We use the group number of an element to indicate the number of valence electrons that it contributes to the molecule.
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Lewis Structures Lewis Structures Once we have determined the number of total valence electrons we can start distributing them throughout the molecule
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This note was uploaded on 04/12/2011 for the course CHEM 1010 taught by Professor Marshall during the Spring '11 term at North Texas.

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lewis-structures - 2peripheralLewisbondedtoacentralLewis...

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