orbitals-configuration-handout

orbitals-configuration-handout - Orbitals and Electron...

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Orbitals and Electron configurations Pauli Exclusion Principle • Reference: pg. 203 • The Pauli Exclusion Principle states that each electron (waveform) has a unique set of quantum numbers • No two electrons can have the same values for all quantum numbers • Kinda like how each apartment in a building has only one address • Q: How many electrons will fit in shell 5 (i.e. what is the max. shell population for n=5)? Electrons in n = 5 shell Q - what is the maximum shell population of n = 5 n = 5 l = 0(s) l = 1(p) l = 2(d) l = 3(f) m l = 0 m l = 1 m l = 0 m l = -1 A - 50 (2+6+10+14+18) l = 4 has 9 orbitals: it has 18 electrons or 2(5) 2 = 50 l = 4(g) m s = 1/2 m s = -1/2 m s = 1/2 m s = -1/2 m s = 1/2 m s = -1/2 m s = 1/2 m s = -1/2 Filling orbitals with electrons: film • Movie (10 minutes) (at t=20) • 0 - 3: review Bohr explained some observations. However, he failed in other areas. Later we will look at probability distributions
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This note was uploaded on 04/12/2011 for the course CHEM 1010 taught by Professor Marshall during the Spring '11 term at North Texas.

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