quantum-mechanics

quantum-mechanics - Quantum Mechanics We will see:...

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Quantum Mechanics
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Quantum Mechanics overview We will see: electrons have discrete energies, not because they are in shells but because they can only have certain wavelengths Line spectra are not due to electrons jumping from shell to shell (as in Bohr’s model)… Instead they’re due to electrons transforming from one wavelength (waveform) to another Each electron is a wave that can be described by a series of “quantum numbers” There are four quantum numbers: n, l , m l , m s Today we will be looking at the first three The combination of these 3 defines an “orbital”
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Waves: standing, travelling Read pg. 199 - 200 (stop at “The theory of quantum mechanics…” –3 rd paragraph) Q1: What is the difference between standing and traveling waves? Q2 – How many wavelengths (W) are represented in each figure below? W = 1
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Waves: standing, travelling Q1 - A standing wave is the combination of two waves (travelling in opposite directions). It has nodes, where a portion of the wave
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quantum-mechanics - Quantum Mechanics We will see:...

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