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Electrostatics - Electrostatics Nay electrophun History The...

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Electrostatics Nay, electrophun!!!
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History The word electricity comes from the Greek elektron which means “amber”. The “amber effect” is what we call static electricity.
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History Ben Franklin made the arbitrary choice of calling one of the demo situations positive and one negative . He also argued that when a certain amount of charge is produced on one body, an equal amount of the opposite charge is produced on the other body…
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Charge Concepts Opposite charges attract, like charges repel. Law of Conservation of Charge: The net amount of electric charge produced in any process is zero. t hanks Ben!!! Symbol : q, Q Unit : C, Coulomb
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Elementary Particles Particle Charge, (C) Mass, (kg) electron -1.6x10 -19 9.109x10 -31 proton +1.6x10 -19 1.673x10 -27 neutron 0 1.675x10 -27 If an object has a… + charge it has less electrons than normal - charge it has more electrons than normal 19 # 1.6 10 total q electrons x - =
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Ions and Polarity If an atom loses or gains valence electrons to become + or - , that atom is now called an ion .
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