chapter19 - Chapter 19 Magnetism Magnets Poles of a magnet...

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Chapter 19 Magnetism
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Magnets Poles of a magnet are the ends where objects are most strongly attracted Two poles, called north and south Like poles repel each other and unlike poles attract each other Similar to electric charges Magnetic poles cannot be isolated If a permanent magnetic is cut in half repeatedly, you will still have a north and a south pole This differs from electric charges There is some theoretical basis for monopoles, but none have been detected
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More About Magnetism An unmagnetized piece of iron can be magnetized by stroking it with a magnet Somewhat like stroking an object to charge it Magnetism can be induced If a piece of iron, for example, is placed near a strong permanent magnet, it will become magnetized
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Types of Magnetic Materials Soft magnetic materials, such as iron, are easily magnetized They also tend to lose their magnetism easily Hard magnetic materials, such as cobalt and nickel, are difficult to magnetize They tend to retain their magnetism
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Sources of Magnetic Fields The region of space surrounding a moving charge includes a magnetic field The charge will also be surrounded by an electric field A magnetic field surrounds a properly magnetized magnetic material
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Magnetic Fields A vector quantity Symbolized by Direction is given by the direction a north pole of a compass needle points in that location Magnetic field lines can be used to show how the field lines, as traced out by a compass, would look B
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Magnetic Field Lines, sketch A compass can be used to show the direction of the magnetic field lines (a) A sketch of the magnetic field lines (b)
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Magnetic Field Lines, Bar Magnet Iron filings are used to show the pattern of the magnetic field lines The direction of the field is the direction a north pole would point
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Magnetic Field Lines, Unlike Poles Iron filings are used to show the pattern of the magnetic field lines The direction of the field is the direction a north pole would point Compare to the magnetic field produced by an electric dipole
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Magnetic Field Lines, Like Poles Iron filings are used to show the pattern of the electric field lines The direction of the field is the direction a north pole would point Compare to the electric field produced by like charges
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Earth’s Magnetic Field The Earth’s geographic north pole corresponds to a magnetic south pole The Earth’s geographic south pole corresponds to a magnetic north pole Strictly speaking, a north pole should be a “north - seeking” pole and a south pole a “south - seeking” pole
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Earth’s Magnetic Field The Earth’s magnetic field resembles that achieved by burying a huge bar magnet deep in the Earth’s interior
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Dip Angle of Earth’s Magnetic Field If a compass is free to rotate vertically as well as horizontally, it points to the earth’s surface The angle between the horizontal and the direction of the magnetic field is called the dip angle
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chapter19 - Chapter 19 Magnetism Magnets Poles of a magnet...

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