Lecture06_Pushkar_2011

Lecture06_Pushkar_2011 - Lecture 6 UNIMPORTABLE:...

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Lecture 6 Purdue University, Physics 220 1 UNIMPORTABLE: #128028BA,2 #17430155,6 #17605423,6 #1915363A,6 #19526922,4 #1D987FFA,4 #1DDDBB7B,6 #1F2DD2E0,2 #222C8F81,4 #22320E1E,6 #22377C69,4 #2238DDC7,4#223B574E,0#228A11B9, 6#22A4C94F,6#22AD1F90,4#22C57F98 ,0#22EF76BB,2#272F08,6#43BBF8,0#5 A141E5,4#72DDAF,0#757F5A5,4#7FA2 0DD,4#82D6D48,4#8C1AF66,4#9155E4 2,0#92981A1,4#9983FAE,2#A2E1135,4 #ADD499E,2#C79FF8A,6#D9A8413,4# DA09A37,4#DB602B9,6#DCB9A5C,6#D CFC200,4#DCFD311,2#DD176AA,6#DE 237D8,0#DE2E906,0#DE540A8,2#DF6A 45F,6#E083731,4#E15EEF5,2#E201D3 3,0#E316E51,6#E61006F,0#E662149,4 #E784137,4#EA574DF,0#EB66DD5,2  #F202C03,6#F9E9405,6 UNIMPORTABLE: #128028BA,4 #17430155,2 #17605423,6 #19526922,4 #1D987FFA,4 #1DDDBB7B,4 #1F2DD2E0,2 #21D455A,4 #22165266,4 #222C8F81,6 #22320E1E,2 #22377C69,4#2238DDC7,4#223B574E, 4#228A11B9,4#22A4C94F,0#22AD1F90 ,2#22C57F98,4#22EF76BB,6#272F08,2 #43BBF8,4#5A141E5,4#72DDAF,0#757 F5A5,4#7FA20DD,4#82D6D48,0#8C1AF 66,2#9155E42,0#92981A1,2#9983FAE, 4#A2E1135,6#ADD499E,6#C79FF8A,6# D9A8413,4#DA09A37,2#DB602B9,2#D CB9A5C,6#DCFC200,4#DCFD311,2#D D176AA,2#DE237D8,4#DE2E906,2#DE 540A8,4#DF6A45F,2#E083731,4#E15E EF5,4#E201D33,0#E316E51,4#E61006 F,4#E662149,2#E784137,4#EA574DF,2 #EB66DD5,4#F202C03,4#F9E9405,2
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Lecture 6 Purdue University, Physics 220 2 Lecture 06 Projectile Motion Textbook Sections 4.2 PHYSICS 220
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Lecture 6 Purdue University, Physics 220 3 y x 2-Dimensions X and Y are INDEPENDENT! Break 2-D problem into two 1-D problems
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Lecture 6 4 Relative Velocity We often assume that our reference frame is attached to the Earth. Give examples when the reference frame is moving at a constant velocity with respect to the Earth:
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Lecture 6 Purdue University, Physics 220 5 Relative Velocity We often assume that our reference frame is attached to the Earth. What
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Lecture06_Pushkar_2011 - Lecture 6 UNIMPORTABLE:...

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