Lecture6

Lecture6 - Week 6. Editing What this lecture will cover...

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Week 6. Editing
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What this lecture will cover Review of basic types of film Editing Classical editing as narrative language Analytical editing Continuity editing Development of Narrative Notion of Classical Cinema
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Editing as Film Form Editing conjoins two shots. Conversely, one defines a shot as the film between two edits. Cut [most common] Dissolve [ellipsis, dream, etc.] Wipe [associated with 1930s cinema; antiquated] Fade [heaviest “pause”]
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Editing as Relation However, editing is more than a process in filmmaking. It is a concept about the effect that conjoining shots has on the film. Editing, for film analysis, means the relationship between shots. This relationship can be read for: Purely formal qualities : tempo and composition Narrative meaning : communication of story and character Intellectual meaning : communication of ideas
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Editing as purely formal quality Like cinematography, editing can be understood for the artistic properties alone. Tempo: Editing determines the pace of a film. Sometimes, rhythmic editing highlights the tempo to create musical- effects with the edits. Composition: Putting two shots together also juxtaposes two shot compositions. If the edit connects shots with similar compositions, the edit is a graphic match .
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Graphic Match Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown
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Narrative language: Classical/Postclassical Editing Often, though, we look at the ways editing carries narrative meaning. Classical cinema developed storytelling conventions that still influence the way films and TV shows are told. Throughout, classical editing adopted the following for reasons of clarity, legibility, invisibility of style, expressiveness, and balance: Editing as Punctuation (between scenes) Analytical Editing Continuity Editing
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Editing as punctuation Since narrative structure in classical cinema follows Act-Scene structure similar to theater, editing can present hierarchy of actions while preserving unity of time and place. Dissolves and wipes signal a change in place/time while regular cuts do not entail such a change.
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Narrative functions of editing Analytical editing breaks down space of a scene to highlight action, narrative importance, and character expression. This is done to: directs attention to action, actor expression or objects suggests subjectivity of character structures shifts in character perspective, as in dialogue scenes In other words, analytical editing helps narrate
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History of analytical editing Analytical editing can best be understood by its opposites, early and contemporary art/indie film: Early cinema (1895-1910) used tableau composition held in long take. Classical cinema
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Lecture6 - Week 6. Editing What this lecture will cover...

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