StOC2112 CH3 spring 2011

StOC2112 CH3 spring 2011 - StOC2112 StOC2112 Preview...

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StOC 2112 StOC 2112
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                                          Preview Preview Attendance Humanistic theories of persuasion Rhetoric Social change and power oriented  perspectives toward persuasion  Exercises
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Brief History of Rhetoric Began in Ancient Greece (400 bc.) Sophists, Plato,  Aristotle Rediscovered in Rome (0 ad.) Cicero, Quintilian  Appropriated by the Holy Roman Empire (300  ad.) St. Augustine Rarely discussed (500 ad. to 2000 ad.) Bacon, Ramus, Hugh Blair, etc.  Rediscovered as an “architectonic” art (2000 ad.  to present) Toulmin, Burke, Foucault, etc.
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Defining Rhetoric  Defining Rhetoric  “The application of reason to imagination  for the better moving of the will.” - Francis  Bacon “The use of language as a symbolic  means of inducing cooperation in beings  that by nature respond to symbols.” -  Kenneth Burke “Concerned with the question of how…we  come to accept and transform our sense of 
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5 Aristotle Ancient Greek philosopher Student of Plato and teacher  to Alexander The Great Father of western metaphysics Wrote on many topics in  addition to rhetoric and logic
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6 Aristotle’s “On Rhetoric” Written in response to Plato Views rhetoric as an art  First book on rhetorical theory Defines rhetoric as the “the faculty of  discovering in any particular case the  available means of persuasion”
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Key Concepts: Rhetoric and  Dialectic  Opens book by stating rhetoric is  “the counterpart to dialectic” Dialectic  is Plato’s method of  arriving at truths through rational  dialogue (e.g., the Socratic  elenchus) Aristotle sees  rhetoric  as the art  that allows these truths to be  communicated to an audience Rhetoric is thus an expedient  form of dialectic
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Key Concepts: Syllogism and  Enthymeme Syllogism:  a form of reasoning where  certain premises are made and a  conclusionary premise follows  According to Plato this technique leads to the  arrival of truth  Enthymeme:  a partial syllogism,  leaving out or implying the minor  premise  According to Aristotle this technique allows  speakers to communicate truth more  expediently
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Key Concepts: Syllogism and  Enthymeme Syllogism Example Major Premise: 
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This note was uploaded on 04/11/2011 for the course STRCC 2112 taught by Professor Joshhanan during the Spring '11 term at Temple.

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StOC2112 CH3 spring 2011 - StOC2112 StOC2112 Preview...

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