StOC2112 CH8 Spring 2011

StOC2112 CH8 Spring 2011 - StOC 2112 StOC Preview Preview...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
StOC 2112 StOC 2112
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Preview Preview CH 8: Logical Premises Premises Proof Evidence Reasoning Syllogisms Toulmin model Activity
Background image of page 2
What Is Proof? Evidence connected through reasoning that is used to persuade Evidence: Information used to support claims Reasoning: The means through which people comprehend differences between opposing claims 3
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Types of Evidence Direct Experience Dramatic Evidence Narratives Testimony Anecdotes Participation and Demonstration Objective Evidence Statistics 4
Background image of page 4
Types of Evidence Direct Experience Information that becomes part of one’s memory and is referred to repeatedly as a reference point for one’s own actions. 5
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Dramatic Evidence helps paint a personal picture adds emotion to persuasion Problematic because it is often reflects an  isolated case
Background image of page 6
Dramatic Evidence Narratives  In-depth story about one particular occurrence Anecdotes  Short, undeveloped examples Expert testimony  Ensure expert is  actually  an expert as claimed
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Problems with Dramatic Evidence the person telling the story might not be providing accurate information insignificant shifts in wording can lead to significantly different conclusions The expert testifying may not be the right kind of authority on the subject 8
Background image of page 8
Objective Evidence Can make you sound more  credible, logical, rational (logos) Helps paints a larger picture of your  information (generalizable) Bad because it can often be dry  and removed from personal  experience
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Objective Evidence Statistics: Use of figures and numbers to indicate a  relationship between various  phenomenon
Background image of page 10
Problems with Objective Evidence The data may not derive from a credible source The sample from which the statistics are drawn may not be a representative one.
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/11/2011 for the course STRCC 2112 taught by Professor Joshhanan during the Spring '11 term at Temple.

Page1 / 31

StOC2112 CH8 Spring 2011 - StOC 2112 StOC Preview Preview...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 12. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online