BEL 420 - REPORT WRITING - 30-A

BEL 420 - REPORT WRITING - 30-A - PLANNING THE REPORT This...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
PLANNING THE REPORT This unit focuses on the planning of the long report. Planning involves five steps. 1. Determining the problem. 2. Considering the audience. 3. Conducting the research. 4. Analysing the data. 5. Preparing the outline. STEP I : DETERMINING THE PROBLEM A. DEFINING THE PROBLEM The first task in writing a report is to define the problem, and then to put it in writing. Limit your problem definition to a realistic assessment of what it involves. Do this by asking the six questions good reporters use: the five W's and one H. The five W's are what, why, where, who, and when; the one H is how. Ask yourself : WHAT : What is the purpose of this report? W hat is the recipient’s viewpoint? WHY : Why is this report important? WHERE : Where can the information be researched? WHO : Who will receive this report? Who will benefit from the information? WHEN : When is the information needed? W hen is the report due? HOW : How can the information best be researched? When you identify the purpose (what) of the report, you begin to determine the problem. By deciding why the report is needed, you have taken a step toward isolating the 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
problem. For example, the Personnel Manager of an organisation facing employee relations problems might analyse the problem thus: WHAT : The purpose is to improve employee relations. WHY : Productivity is low, staff turnover is high. WHERE : The information can be found within the organisation. WHO : The Board of Director will receive the report; the staff will benefit from the results. WHEN : The information is needed in 2 weeks' time, for the next Board Meeting. HOW : By speaking to staff and department heads. Consider all aspects of the problem and review all available information. Write a clear definition of the problem, which will serve as a permanent reference throughout the report writing process. B. SELECTING A TITLE As a preliminary to writing the report, select a title that will identify the problem. The reader should know at first glance what the report covers. Titles that are too short – one or two words - are indefinite; they do not express the full range of the report. However, do not make the title so wordy that its meaning becomes cloudy. Guidelines for choosing a title are: 1. Refer to your problem definition. If it is clear and accurate, selecting a title should be easy. 2. Consider the five W’s and one H and use whatever is applicable. 3. Make the title informative, but not necessarily catchy. 4. Omit articles such as a, an, and the, as in “A Study of…”, avoid titles such as “Recommendations for …”, “Conclusions on …”, or “Summary of …”, they are usually unnecessary. 5. When typing the title, separate lines at the end of the thought units rather than 2
Background image of page 2
in the middle. 6.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/11/2011 for the course BEL 420 taught by Professor Profirshah during the Spring '11 term at utmem.edu.

Page1 / 18

BEL 420 - REPORT WRITING - 30-A - PLANNING THE REPORT This...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online