Article in psychology

Article in psychology - Evidence suggests that the majority...

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Evidence suggests that the majority of individuals with bulimic eating disorders —namely, bulimia nervosa (BN), binge eating disorder (BED), and variants xdof these disorders not meeting formal diagnostic criteria—do not receive treatment for an eating problem ( Mond, Hay, Rodgers, & Owen, 2007a ). In a community-based study of outcome in BN, Fairburn, Cooper, Doll, Norman, and O’Connor (2000) found that 26%0. G of young adult women with a diagnosis of BN had ever received treatment for an eating problem . In the New England Women’s Health Project ( Striegel-Moore et al., 2001 ), 40.3% of az with BN had ever received treatment for an eating problem , notwithstanding the fact that most of these individuals had first met criteria for BN some 10 years earlier. In the same study, 17.3% of participants with BED had ever received treatment for an eating problem . In the National Comorbidity Survey Replication Study ( Hudson, Hiripi, Pope, & Kessler, 2007 ), 43.2% of individuals with a lifetime diagnosis of BN and 43.6% of individuals with a lifetime diagnosis of BED had ever received treatment for an eating problem . Similar figures were observed in research conducted by Mond, Hay, et al. (2007a) in a general population sample of women in Australia. Individuals with BN and related disorders do, however, often receive treatment for a comorbid mental health problem , such as depression, for a problem or perceived problem with weight, or for physical health complications associated with disordered eating , such as gastrointestinal complaints and/or symptoms of dehydration (cf. Mond, Hay, et al., 2007a ). Nonspecific treatments of this kind are unlikely to be of sustained benefit in reducing individuals’ levels of eating disorder psychopathology but nevertheless place a considerable burden on health services, particularly in the primary care sector ( Hudson et al., 2007 ; Mond, Hay, et al., 2007a ; Striegel- Moore et al., 2005 ). It is therefore important to identify the correlates of treatment seeking among individuals with bulimic eating disorders and to use this information to develop initiatives that facilitate early and appropriate help seeking. Whereas specific psychotherapy for BN and related disorders is not always effective, there is no question that outcome is improved through early intervention ( Mitchell, Agras, & Wonderlich, 2007 ). Further, among obese individuals who binge eat, stabilization of eating behavior may be associated with improved quality of life irrespective of weight loss, and specific psychotherapy is the most effective means by which to stabilize eating behavior ( Devlin & Fischer, 2005 ; Wilson, Grilo, & Vitousek, 2007 ). Previously, we found that a brief intervention designed to improve eating disorders mental health literacy among women with bulimic -type eating disorders had a number of positive effects on participants’ attitudes and beliefs but did not have an impact on treatment -seeking behavior ( Hay, Mond, Darby, Rodgers, & Owen, 2007 ). In particular, and notwithstanding a focus in the information presented on the nature of eating disorder psychopathology and the role of specific psychotherapy in
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Article in psychology - Evidence suggests that the majority...

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