tyndale_worksheets - Worksheet 1 Questions: Going to the...

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Worksheet 1 Questions: Going to the theatre in Shakespeare’s day 1. How was theatre-going in Elizabethan London different to theatre-going today? (Group 1) 2. How did the playhouses deal with the fact that they had no artificial lighting? (Group1) 3. Why did people have to arrive up to an hour before the start of a performance? (Group 2) 4. What type of place could people have for one penny? (Group2) 5. What type of place did you get for twopence? (Group 2) 6. It was not cheap to go to the theatre. Does this mean that only the rich went to the theatre? (Group 2) 7. What happened while people were waiting for the play to start? (Group 3) 8. The theatre was small, but the stage was ________________. This meant that the actors could get quite close to the audience. (Group 3) 9. Why did the audience have to use their imagination? (Group 4) 10.How did Shakespeare help the audience with this? (Group 4) 11.Although theatre companies spent no money on stage scenery, they spent a lot of money on _______________ and ________________. (Group 4) 12.Where would the players performing the live music be? (Group 4) 13.How important was going to the theatre in lives of Elizabethan Londoners? (Group 1) 1
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Worksheet 2 Activities: Prologue What’s it all about??? Romeo and Juliet begins with a prologue , in which the audience is told what will happen in the play. Can you think of any novels or films that begin in a similar way? Do you think this might spoil the play for the audience? 1. Read the prologue to the play again. Working in pairs, rewrite the prologue in everyday English, as it might sound if someone wrote in the year 2004. You might begin with these words: The story you’re about to watch takes place in a town named Verona… 2. When you have completed your version of the prologue, form into a group of four students and compare your attempts. Did you use similar words? Which parts of the prologue did you find difficult to translate? From your two attempts choose the words and phrases you all think work best, and write one prologue for the group. 3. Select one person from your group to read the prologue aloud in class. While that person is reading, the other members of the group will make freeze frames to show what happens in the play. ( Freeze frames are like frozen pictures. You must show the class what happens by moving into position, as though you were a photograph, and remaining frozen until the next scene. You will need 6-8 frames.) 2
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Worksheet 3 Activities: Act 1 Scene 1 1. Rewrite the Prince’s speech on page 7 (lines 75-97) in your own words. You may either write an 8-10 line summary, or re-write it line by line. 2. Create a visual representation of romantic love as you see it.
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This note was uploaded on 04/11/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Mkayed during the Spring '11 term at Arab Open University, Amman.

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tyndale_worksheets - Worksheet 1 Questions: Going to the...

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