Agri_ppt - Click to edit Master subtitle style 4/12/11...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Click to edit Master subtitle style 4/12/11 Agriculture 4/12/11 Introduction Ø The Agricultural Revolution; the process whereby humans learned to cultivate crops and domesticate animals. Ø Hearth areas Ø The Tigris-Euphrates river valley (also known as Mesopotamia or the Fertile Crescent) Ø South east Asia Ø Middle America 4/12/11 Ø Origins of Agriculture Ø Hunter-gatherers Ø Small groups - limited technology – limited carrying capacity Ø Invention of Agriculture Ø Combination of accident and experiment Ø Multiple Independent hearth areas Ø Vegetative Planting Ø Seed planting 4/12/11 Changes with the Agricultural Revolution Ø Innovations - these were limited and there was a limit on the increase in carrying capacity (and therefore population growth) in any one place. Main innovations were the plow, the wheel and the use of irrigation technology. Ø Plant selection – the plants that were cultivated were wheat (Mesopotamia); rice (south east Asia) and corn (middle America). Secondary crops included barley, apples and onions (Mesopotamia); cabbages, peaches and soybeans (China); coffee, cotton and melons (West Africa); potatoes, peppers, peanuts, tobacco and rubber (South America); tomatoes, squash and beans (Central America); blueberry, cranberry and sunflower (North America); raspberry, oats, rye (Europe). Ø Plant modification – specific plants were chosen because they provide a high yield for relatively little work – over time these plants were modified to provide higher and higher yields. 4/12/11 4/12/11 4/12/11 4/12/11 Agricultural Regions Reading: Section 10.2 4/12/11 Types of Cultivation Ø In general there are two broad types of cultivation or farming: Ø Subsistence farming : this involves farming to produce just enough food and fiber to support a family. Most subsistence farming takes place in Peripheral countries. Subsistence farming requires a very high percentage of the population to be farmers Ø Commercial Farming: this involves the production of food or fiber for the market. Most commercial farming takes place in Core countries, however, it is becoming increasingly common among wealthier farmers in the periphery. Much smaller percentage of population involved in farming. 4/12/11...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 04/11/2011 for the course GEOG 1123 taught by Professor Neely/turner during the Spring '08 term at Arkansas.

Page1 / 37

Agri_ppt - Click to edit Master subtitle style 4/12/11...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online