Unknown

Unknown - March 28th-April 8th Identification of Unknowns,...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
March 28 th -April 8 th Identification of Unknowns, Evaluation PURE CULTURE UNKNOWN REPORT Unknown Tube #: Name of Pure Culture (URT) Organism: ___________________________________ Gram Stain __________ Cell Morphology and Arrangement __________________ Colony Morphology: _________________________________________________ Test Results (if performed) URT Organism Gram Stain Hemolysis Oxidase Catalase Coagulase Bile Esculin “A” Disc “P” Disc Comments: (submit a copy of this to your lab instructor) * * * MCRO251 Lab Manual 59
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
MIXED CULTURE UNKNOWN REPORT Unknown Tube #: Name of Enteric Organism #1 _________________________________________ Name of Enteric Organism #2 _________________________________________ Colony Morphology Enteric Organism #1 ________________________________________________________________ Colony Morphology Enteric Organism #2 ________________________________________________________________ Test Results (if performed) Organism #1 Organism #2 TSI Citrate Urease ODC Indole Motility Oxidase Comments: (submit a copy of this to your lab instructor) WEEK 12: November 30 – December 6 MCRO251 Lab Manual 60
Background image of page 2
ELISA, ABO Blood Groups Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) Introduction Since its development more than thirty years ago, the ELISA has become increasingly popular due to its speed, accuracy, and the fact that there is no requirement for special equipment or radioactive reagents. Depending on the design of the procedure, the ELISA may be used to detect either antigen or antibody. In the direct ELISA, the patient sample is tested for the presence of an antigen, for example, respiratory syncitial virus on a nasal swab. The indirect ELISA tests for the presence of specific antibody in the patient sample. For example, the presumptive test for HIV is an indirect ELISA, which tests for the presence of anti-HIV antibodies in a patient’s blood sample. In today's indirect ELISA, specific antigen is adsorbed (coated) onto the walls of a series of microtiter wells. The patient sample (possibly containing the specific antibody being tested for) is diluted in a series of four-fold dilutions, and then incubated in the well, allowing the specific serum antibody to bind to the immobilized antigen. A higher concentration of patient antibody results in a higher number of antigen:antibody pairings bound to the wall of a given well. After rinsing to remove unbound antibody a second antibody is added to the well. This second antibody is produced in an animal such as a mouse or a goat using human IgG as a foreign antigen. This second antibody binds to the antigen-antibody complexes already attached, resulting in more bound complexes in wells with a higher concentration of primary antibody. During its original preparation, this second antibody was also conjugated (attached) to an enzyme molecule, in this case, alkaline phosphatase. Now after rinsing the unbound secondary antibody from the wells, the enzyme’s substrate is added. Any bound enzyme will react with the
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/12/2011 for the course MCRO 251 taught by Professor Lorrainecramer during the Spring '09 term at UNC.

Page1 / 15

Unknown - March 28th-April 8th Identification of Unknowns,...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online